Reeling it in

Yesterday we saw a naturopathist and my breast surgeon for followup. I need to change my diet to support my health and aid in my treatment. The naturopathist asked if I’d been told to go off my birth control (NuvaRing), which I had not. I didn’t even think about it but yeah, given that they say this on their website:

NuvaRing is also not for women with high blood pressure that medicine can’t control; diabetes with kidney, eye, nerve, or blood vessel damage; certain kinds of severe migraine headaches; liver disease or liver tumors; unexplained vaginal bleeding; breast cancer or any cancer that is sensitive to female hormones; or if you are or may be pregnant.

and that we know my cancer is ER+, seems like that should have been something ONE of the THREE doctors I have seen should have mentioned to me. Thanks, guys. So I’ll take that out at the end of this cycle and then… what. I guess we go back to condoms? My doctor told me the diaphragm has been replaced by the cervical cap, although the research I did has not indicated to me that they have stopped making the diaphragm (which is what she said). Anyhow I have messaged my OBGyn about getting an appointment to talk about that.

Overall I am doing better emotionally. There’s not much to be done till we get the Oncotype DX results, which won’t be for a couple weeks. There are three risk categories associated with the results on that. I am praying I will be in the lowest risk group but I have an ominous feeling, given that this cancer came seemingly out of nowhere (or maybe from birth control) and then was an aggressive type. I am resigned to chemo and radiation, but still not endocrine therapy. Julian and I have discussed it at length and in the end we will weigh all the options and make a decision. But it’s not “just” having another baby that affects my opinion on taking Tamoxifen – it’s articles like this and like this. Julian discovered that second one, unasked, and sent it to me. It’s reading blog after blog and digest after digest of women bemoaning Tamoxifen and its insufferable side effects. It’s wondering, very seriously, if this isn’t a case where the treatment is worse than the disease. If it was one year of it, that would be one thing. But five years? That’s a damned long time.

Also, you might be wondering why suddenly all the talk of chemo when before it seemed like if my node was negative we were golden. Well, that was when they thought the tumor was less than a centimeter – 8 mm to be exact. Pathology showed it to be 1.2cm, so that throws us into a whole new risk/treatment category. Super awesome. Another thing that was kind of sprung on us at the medical oncology appointment, which we were kind of blindsided by.

I am lucky because J is being super supportive and we both agree that we want to get a second opinion, and that Tamoxifen may not be the best course for me. I am so grateful that he isn’t just blindly accepting everything the doctors say and is being analytical and open minded. I really feel like he is taking my emotions and instincts into consideration and giving them serious weight with regard to decision making. It makes everything a lot easier.

The naturopathist recommended curcumin (an anti-inflammatory derived from turmeric) and something called Host Defense MyCommunity (an immune system booster) as well as increasing my intake of veggie omega-3, although another friend said her doctor disagreed with that recommendation based on recent research (I’ll have to look into this myself). The naturopathist also recommended specific vegetables and protein sources, as well as trying to keep my blood sugar stable throughout the day. I’ve ordered a couple cookbooks (The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen: Nourishing, Big-Flavor Recipes for Cancer Treatment and Recovery and Kicking Cancer in the Kitchen: The Girlfriend’s Cookbook and Guide to Using Real Food to Fight Cancer) as Jules is determined to start cooking anti-cancer meals for me and I’m sure as hell not complaining.

In the meantime, as usual, tick tock. Hopefully those results will come back soon.

2 thoughts on “Reeling it in

  1. I’ve been looking at Cancer Fighting Kitchen too, it looks great. I scour the internet for information of cancer from countries like Germany, the Netherlands and Switzerland. They seem to embrace a more multi-pronged approach of integrative, alternative and modern medicine. (Side note: I was way too enthusiastic about eating fresh turmeric this past summer and found out that sometimes it increases symptoms of gall stones – nauseas and right side pain, but it was right-out-of-the-ground fresh, pretty sure I’d need to eat a LOT of dried turmeric for any gallstone distress again.)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, I definitely agree that holistic is the way to go! I am down with modern medicine but believe herbs and diet can also have a huge impact. And lifestyle, of course – try to keep active and stay positive.

      Good information on the turmeric! I actually inherited my Dad’s shoddy gallbladder, so had it removed in January. Yes, 2015 has been a real party for me!

      Liked by 1 person

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